Veterinary Technician Schools in Ohio

There are a number of quality, accredited veterinary technician schools in Ohio for current residents and those considering a move to the Buckeye state. From the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on Cleveland's waterfront to the Hocking Hills State Park, the "Heart of it All" offers ample opportunities to animal-lovers seeking a thriving career in veterinary medicine. 

Here are the typical steps for aspiring vet techs in Ohio:

 

1.  Graduate from one of the accredited vet tech schools in Ohio.

These programs last from two to four years, and typically offer an associate of science (A.S.), an associate of applied science (A.A.S.), or a bachelor's degree (B.A.) upon successful completion of the requirements. According the O*NET (2013), a partner of the American Job Center, a large majority of vet techs held associate degrees (68%). The veterinary technician programs in Ohio offer classes such as veterinary lab procedures, pharmacology and large animal medicine. These accredited schools pay thought to coursework as well as hands-on, clinical practicums to let students get experience in the veterinary field. Some vet tech students in Ohio choose to take electives in areas such as animal psychology, radiology, or anesthesia, and these specializations may even enhance a graduate's job prospects.

 

2.  Take the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE).

 

3.  Register with the Ohio Veterinary Medical Licensing Board (OVMLB).

While there is no special state test for vet techs in Ohio, they are required to register with the OVMLB. The application requirements are listed below. For those who are licensed in other states, they can apply for a Veterinary License by Reciprocity with a letter of good standing from the current licensing entity. 

 

It should be noted that veterinary technicians in Ohio are required to renew their licenses by March 1st in odd-numbered years after completing ten hours of continued education credit.

 

According to the Ohio Association of Veterinary Technicians, aspiring veterinary technicians typically take an oath which begins,

  

"I solemnly dedicate myself to aiding animals and society by providing excellent care and services for animals, by alleviating animal suffering, and by promoting public health.

 

With such heartwarming words to defend, it's no wonder that the career outlook for vet techs in Ohio looks bright.

Website Url main address vet tech & assistant grads (2012)
Bradford School 2469 Stelzer Road, Columbus, Ohio, 43219 93
Stautzenberger College-Brecksville 8001 Katherine Boulevard, Brecksville, Ohio, 44141 85
Columbus State Community College 550 E Spring St, Columbus, Ohio, 43215 61
Brown Mackie College-Cincinnati 1011 Glendale-Milford Rd, Cincinnati, Ohio, 45215-1107 48
Stautzenberger College-Maumee 1796 Indian Wood Circle, Maumee, Ohio, 43537-4007 44
Miami-Jacobs Career College-Troy 865 W Market St, Troy, Ohio, 45373 35
Brown Mackie College-Findlay 1700 Fostoria Ave, Suite 100, Findlay, Ohio, 45840 32
University of Cincinnati-Blue Ash College 9555 Plainfield Rd, Blue Ash, Ohio, 45236-1096 32
Brown Mackie College-Akron 755 White Pond Dr., Suite 101, Akron, Ohio, 44320 29
Brown Mackie College-North Canton 4300 Munson Street, NW, Canton, Ohio, 44718 28
Cuyahoga Community College District 700 Carnegie Ave, Cleveland, Ohio, 44115-2878 22
Northcoast Medical Training Academy 1832 State Route 59, Kent, Ohio, 44240 19
Kent State University at Tuscarawas 330 University Dr N.E., New Philadelphia, Ohio, 44663-9403 13
Miami Valley Career Technology Center 6800 Hoke Rd, Clayton, Ohio, 45315 9
Otterbein University 1 South Grove Street, Westerville, Ohio, 43081 2
Notes:2012 vet tech graduate data from IPEDS (2013).
Schools that offer at least one vet tech or vet assistant program online

Ohio Outlook for the Vet Tech Field

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS 2014), job openings for veterinary technicians and technologists are expected to grow 30% between 2012 and 2022, nearly three times faster than the average projected for all occupations (11%). With the creation of 25,000 new jobs nationally, many of these in more rural regions, becoming a veterinary technician in Ohio can be an important investment in one's future.

The BLS reports that there were 3,300 jobs for vet techs in Ohio in May 2013. They made on average $14.43 per hour, or $30,020 annually. Here is the salary range for these animal-care professionals in Ohio:

  • 10th percentile - $20,630
  • 50th percentile (median) - $29,240
  • 90th percentile - $39,360

Considering that veterinary technician schools in Ohio typically cost a fraction of an annual salary, this is an investment that can pay off.

Furthermore, some areas of Ohio offer higher salaries than others. According to the BLS (2013), these were the top-paying areas for vet techs in Ohio and the mean annual salaries:

  • Columbus, OH - $26,020
  • Cleveland - Elyria - Mentor, OH - $25,710
  • Canton - Massillon, OH - $25,580
  • Cincinnati - Middletown (OH - KY - IN) - $23,200
  • Dayton, OH - $22,290

The BLS (2013) also reports the highest-employing areas for veterinary technicians in Ohio, metropolitan and nonmetropolitan. These were the top five employing areas for vet techs in the state:

  • Cleveland - Elyria - Mentor, 560 employed
  • Columbus, 450
  • Cincinnati - Middletown (OH - KY - IN), 320
  • Akron, 290
  • Other Ohio nonmetropolitan areas, 220

Graduates of vet tech schools in Ohio can find different types of opportunities available to them after they have completed their education. Typical places they can look for jobs include animal hospitals, boarding facilities, private vet offices, research facilities, and more. As mentioned, the Ohio Association of Veterinary Technicians can be a great resource for vet techs working in Ohio who are in need of continuing education, resources, networking, and more, and it has small chapters throughout the state. The association also offers an employment board with job listings.

Choose Quality, Accredited Vet Tech Schools in Ohio

According to the Ohio Veterinary Medical Licensing Board (OVMLB), there are many AVMA-accredited veterinary technician schools in Ohio.

Here is a sampling of the top options:

Columbus State Community College offers an associate of applied science (A.A.S.) degree in veterinary technology, and has full accreditation from the AVMA. Its program helps to prepare  students for work in the real world, and has relationships with 160 different clinics in the state where students can train and get experience while going through the practical parts of their schooling. Students in this degree program learn about:

  • Animal care
  • Patient assessments
  • Preparation of medication according to a prescription
  • Surgical care
  • Wound care

The Vet Tech Institute at Bradford School in Columbus offers an 18-month associate degree program in veterinary technology for students. The school has full AVMA accreditation, which means that students who complete the course of work and graduate should be well prepared to to take the national exam (VTNE) for licensure. The school offers courses that cover a variety of areas including:

  • Anatomy
  • Anesthesia
  • Large animals
  • Small animals
  • Physiology

Cuyahoga Community College in Parma is another available choice for students in Ohio seeking vet tech programs. The school offers an associate of applied science (A.A.S) degree in veterinary technology, and has AVMA accreditation. Students can watch a video on YouTube to learn more about the various aspects of the program.

Brown Mackie College in Akron offers an associate of applied science (A.A.S.) degree in veterinary technology, and is recommended by the OVMLB. Students learn a variety of lab procedures, as well as how to assist with anesthesia and surgery. The Brown Mackie College has a number of campuses for vet tech schools in Ohio cities, including Cincinnati, North Canton, and Findlay.

Accreditation and Certification for Schools and Vet Techs in Ohio

The primary accreditation body for vet tech schools is Ohio is the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). The AVMA bases it accreditation on many factors, including the quality of the curriculum, instruction, facilities, and program outcomes. Going to a school that does not have accreditation means students typically cannot sit for the exam required for licensure. 

Upon graduation from an accredited vet tech school in Ohio, students typically need to become certified in the state of Ohio. There is no state test for licensure in Ohio, but students are required to take the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE). To pass, vet techs need to score a 75 or greater. In addition to passing the test, students must submit an application to the Ohio Veterinary Medical Licensing Board (OVMLB). The requirements of the application include:

  • Recent photograph (print name and DOB on back)
  • Sealed envelope with official transcript from an AVMA-accredited vet tech school
  • Registration fee ($35 in odd-numbered years, $25 in even-numbered years)
  • Transfer of VTNE scores to the OVMLB
  • Have the Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) perform an Ohio and FBI criminal background check, and have the BCI send the results directly to the OVMLB

Consult the OVMLB website to learn more about the rules and regulations governing working vets and vet techs in the state of Ohio.

After the initial licensure, vet techs in Ohio must renew their licenses by March 1st in odd-numbered years. Additionally, they must have at least ten hours of continuing education. At least six of these hours need to be related to veterinary medical science, while the other four hours can be non-scientific and self-taught (e.g., journals, videos, computer training, or office management).

Becoming a vet tech in Ohio can be a rewarding choice for animal-lovers seeking a career with a bright job prospects on into the future.