Vet Tech Schools in Missouri

Working in the veterinary technician field can be rewarding on a number of different levels. Anyone who wants to have a career that makes a difference could love the idea of becoming a vet tech. The field has some wonderful people, and it’s easy to connect and meet with others through conferences and professional associations. Those who have an interest in the field should check out vet tech schools in Missouri, particularly since the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts there will be an increase in jobs for vet techs in upcoming years.

Website Url main address vet tech & assistant grads (2012)
Hickey College 940 Westport Plaza, Saint Louis, Missouri, 63146 70
Sanford-Brown College-Fenton 1345 Smizer Mill Road, Fenton, Missouri, 63026-3400 45
Sanford-Brown College-St Peters 100 Richmond Center Blvd, Saint Peters, Missouri, 63376 31
Jefferson College 1000 Viking Drive, Hillsboro, Missouri, 63050-2440 22
Metropolitan Community College-Kansas City 3200 Broadway, Kansas City, Missouri, 64111-2429 21
Midwest Institute 964 South Highway Drive, Fenton, Missouri, 63026 18
Crowder College 601 Laclede Ave, Neosho, Missouri, 64850 14
Franklin Technology-MSSU 3950 E. Newman Road, Joplin, Missouri, 64801-1595 8
Anthem College-Kansas City 9001 State Line Rd, Kansas City, Missouri, 64114 4
Brown Mackie College-St Louis 2 Soccer Park Rd, Fenton, Missouri, 63026 3
Notes:2012 vet tech graduate data from IPEDS (2013).
Schools that offer at least one vet tech or vet assistant program online

Job Demand for Vet Techs in MO

Jobs for vet techs are expected to grow much faster than average from 2012 to 2022, according to the BLS. Nationwide, this should reach 30 percent, which could result in 25,000 new vet tech jobs available in the U.S during this time. As of 2012, 1,400 vet techs were employed in Missouri, according to the BLS. Naturally, the majority of the techs were working in the communities with the highest populations. The Kansas City area had 580, while the Columbia area had 150.

Many prospective vet techs wonder where they can work with then graduate. Fortunately, many different types of employers need to hire vet techs. Some of them include:

  • Animal hospitals
  • Large farms
  • Private clinics
  • Research facilities and labs
  • Zoological societies

Missouri does not have a specific association for vet techs so vet techs may want to join an organization such as the National Association of Veterinary Technicians, or NAVTA. It has many different resources available on its website, including information on events, career, specialties, and more. Both students of vet tech programs and vet techs already in the career can join as members.

Top Vet Tech Schools in Missouri

The state of Missouri has a large number of schools that offer veterinary technician programs. When choosing a place to attend, students should always select a school with American Veterinary Medical Association accreditation. This ensures that the school is providing a quality education and that students should be prepared to enter the vet tech field following graduation. We list several vet tech schools in Missouri with AVMA accreditation below.

Anthem College (High Tech Institute), in Kansas City, has provisional accreditation from the AVMA. Provisional accreditation simply means the school has received accreditation within the past five years. The program leads to an associate of applied science degree. Day and evening classes are available to provide flexibility to students. The school offers a number of different types of courses to help prepare students to work as vet techs.

Crowder College, in Neosho, has full accreditation from the AVMA. The program leads to an associate of applied science degree and the campus is unique in many ways. It features:

  • An outdoor dog kennel
  • Barns
  • Small animal kennel
  • 300 acres of farmland

Students are also able to care for a number of different animals while they are learning. Students learn about anatomy, surgery assistance, and more.

Jefferson College, in Hillsboro, has full AVMA accreditation and offers an associate of applied science degree. The program covers instruction in:

  • Animal care
  • Clinical applications
  • Food animal technology
  • Lab animal technology
  • Radiology
  • Veterinary hospital technology

Maple Wood Community College, in Kansas City, has had full accreditation since 1975, and provides vet tech graduates with an associate of applied science degree. Students gain hands-on work with 12 animal species and study topics such as:

  • Anesthesia
  • Lab diagnostics
  • Radiology
  • Small and large animals
  • Surgical assistance

Understanding Certification and Accreditation in Missouri

Before becoming a registered veterinary technician in the state of Missouri, candidates first need to go to an approved school and receive either a two-year or a four-year degree. The school needs to have accreditation from the AVMA. Students can find a number of accredited vet tech schools in Missouri listed on the AVMA website.

If a student goes to a school without accreditation, they can offer transcripts to the Missouri Division of Professional Registration to see if the schooling could count as an equivalent education. Once they finish their courses, the applicants need to pass the Veterinary Technician National Exam. If the candidate fails the test, he or she can take the test up to three more times. Additional attempts are not allowed after the fourth failure. After passing the VTNE, the applicant will take the Missouri State Board exam. This tests the applicant on state law when it deals with the veterinary technicians. Once they pass this test, vet tech graduates can apply for their license.

Vet tech schools in Missouri need to have AVMA accreditation because this accreditation enables them to qualify for VTNE testing. The AVMA looks at many different components of a school's program before offering accreditation. These include:

  • Curriculum
  • Physical facilities
  • Staff and faculty

Students who graduate from an AVMA-accredited school should be confident in the education they obtained. They should be qualified to sit for the VTNE and to take the licensing steps to establish their vet tech career.

Barry Franklin (Editor)

Barry joined publisher Sechel Ventures as partner in 2013 and, along with running the business, edits content for VetTechColleges.com.